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What town doesn’t have a street named Victoria, King, Princess or Duke.  Every community has celebrated the British Royal Family in some way, maybe a name of a business like the Queen’s Hotel or the King Theatre.  Next time you are out and about take a look around and see if you can spot any “royally” themed places. 

Over the years, the Museum has come into its possession many items relating to the Royal Family.  Some are quite unique, some have Strathroy-Caradoc connection and some are the “run of the mill” magazines that covered every aspect of the Royal Family from the early 20th century onward.

This blog post highlights just a few of the “Royal Pieces” we have in the collection. 

Starting with Queen Victoria (1837-1901) we have a unique handmade outfit as well as a glass lantern slide.  At the time of her death the whole world mourned including the people of Strathroy (see newspaper article and Memorial Service pamphlet). 

To honour her son King Edward VII (1901-1910), we have a framed photograph given to a local businessman, William Geddes.  George V (1910-1936) was King during a time of war so to commemorate that we have a British War Medal given to R. W. Brown (see previous post on John Brown). 

After George V died Edward VIII became King for les year until he abdicated for love. Edward was one of the shortest-reigning monarchs in British and Commonwealth history. He was never crowned (see magazine article).

His brother King George VI took over the throne in 1936 until his death in 1952.  To commemorate his reign we have from our collection a number of items from when he and his wife (Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) made a Royal visit to Canada in 1939. 

Finally we come to Queen Elizabeth II (1952 – present), when she became Queen at the age of 26 it became front page news and every magazine put her on the cover.  She was even on chewing gum cards and cookie tins. 

In the future will we have King Charles or King William items in the collection?  We will see.

Cyril Lowe 823791

Cyril was born in Nottingham England on 4 July 1893.  When he signed up for the war on April 15, 1916 he is listed as a labourer from 140 Ridout Street in London. 

He was 5’3 with brown hair and brown eyes.  He arrived in England on the S.S. Southland on November 11, 1916 and was killed in action in the attack west of Thelus on April 9, 1917 at the age of 23.  Cyril is buried at the Nine Elms Military Cemetery, France. 

He is honoured on the Strathroy Cenotaph and on the Memorial Window in St John the Evangelist Church in Strathroy.  This is the only Strathroy-Caradoc connection to date.  He may have visited or lived in the area for a short time or had family here.  If anyone has information on Cyril Lowe please contact Museum Strathroy-Caradoc.

For more information on Cyril’s service records please visit the Strathroy Cenotaph website created by John Sargeant.

John Brown 54333

The Brown brothers, Walter, John and Leonard — were members of Mount Carmel Methodist Church who served in the First World War. Of these three Caradoc natives, only Walter and Leonard would return home.

John was born on December 18, 1895 in Mount Brydges to Elizabeth and Robert Brown.  His enlistment forms, signed in January 1915, state he was a farmer with no previous military experience.

By April 18, 1915 he was sailing from Halifax on the S.S. Grampian, on his way to England.  He had only been in England for one month when he came down with the measles and had to stay at Moore Barracks Shorncliffe Kent to recuperate.  By September of the same year he was en route to France to serve in the Machine Gun Corp 4th Company.  After fighting for more than a year he was admitted to # 18 General Hospital in Camiers France in November 1916, where he stayed until January of the following year with P.U.O. (pyrexia or fever).  

He re-joined his unit January 17, 1917 and was promptly promoted to Corporal.  He continued fighting until that fateful day on April 9, 1917 when he was killed at the age of 21. 

He is listed on the Vimy Memorial in France.  His mother received a copper ‘death penny’ and scroll from King George in honour of John’s service. These pennies were a standard token of appreciation given to family members of those who perished in the war.  His mother also received a Memorial Cross and a C.E.F. Mothers in Sacrifice Medal.  He is honoured in the community on the Mount Brydges Honour Roll, and both the Strathroy and Mount Brydges Cenotaph.

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 For more information please visit the Strathroy Cenotaph website created by John Sargeant

James Kellestine 802040

James was born on June 12, 1880 to Warren and Lavina Kallestine. He grew up on Metcalfe Street in Strathroy and worked at the Strathroy Furniture Factory.  He was married in November of 1910 to Grace Odell and had 3 children before he headed to war.  He enlisted on November 27, 1915 with no military experience and commenced training at Camp Borden in July of the following year.  He embarked from Halifax to Liverpool England in August 1916 with the 135th battalion on the S.S. Olympic. 

When James Kellestine made out his will in August of 1916, Asa John Patterson was a witness. 

During the war he fought in different battalions in France and was killed in Action on April 9, 1917 at Vimy Ridge at the age of 37. 

The Age May 10 1917 Kellestine notice

He is buried at the Nine Elms Military Cemetery in Thelus France.

After his death his mother received a certificate of service and his widow received the memorial plaque and scroll and the memorial cross.  He is honoured on the Strathroy Cenotaph.   

For more information please visit the Strathroy Cenotaph website created by John Sargeant.

Asa John Patterson 802074

Asa John was born on October 21, 1895 to Martha Patterson, and he lived at R.R. #2 Longwoods Road.  He enlisted on November 26, 1915 and his attestation papers state that he was a student. He also had prior military training with the 26th Regiment (Middlesex Light Infantry) whose headquarters were in Strathroy.  He left Halifax for Liverpool, England in August 1916 with the 135th battalion on the S.S. Olympic

During his time overseas he was transferred to two different battalions, the 134th and the 15th. 

He was killed in action in the attack at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917 and buried at the Nine Elms Military Cemetery  in Thelus, France.

After his death his mother received a memorial plaque and scroll, and the memorial cross. He is honoured on the Memorial Wall at the Caradoc Community Centre, and on both the Mount Brydges and Strathroy Cenotaphs. He also is commemorated on the Memorial Window at St. John the Evangelist Church in Strathroy.

For more information please visit the Strathroy Cenotaph website created by John Sargeant.

Below is a comment from John Sargeant requesting information on Asa John Patterson.

Charles Perring 802719 

Charles was born to Mrs. Amelia Perring of Walworth South East England on March 4, 1895. When he enlisted on January 14, 1916 he was living in Mount Brydges as a farm labourer.    

On August 22, 1916 he embarked from Halifax to Liverpool England with the 135th battalion on the S.S. Olympic.  During his time overseas he was transferred to a number of different battalions, including the 134th and the 15th

The photo to the left shows Perring on the left with other Strathroy Boys in the 135th.

To further his skills as a soldier he was sent to Grenade School in February 1917.  He continued fighting until that fateful day on April 9, 1917 when he was killed in action in the attack southwest of Thelus, France. He was 22. 

He is buried at the Nine Elms Military Cemetery in Thelus, France.  After his death his mother received a memorial plaque and scroll, and the memorial cross (see below).  He is also honoured in the community on the Mount Carmel Church Shield – Our Heroes, the Mount Brydges and Strathroy Cenotaph, and the Memorial Wall in the Caradoc Community Centre.

 
 

Museum Strathroy Caradoc Collection
For more information please visit the Strathroy Cenotaph website created by John Sargeant.
 
 

Last Saturday was the 94th anniversary of Vimy Ridge.  This First World War battle was fought between April 9 and 12, 1917, in the west of France, with 3,598 Canadian soldiers killed and 10,602 wounded.  This year’s anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge is the end of an era, with no surviving WWI veterans in Canada.  Vimy marked the first time all four Canadian divisions fought on the same battlefield.  They were led by Strathroy-native Sir Arthur William Currie, who was the first Canadian-appointed commander of the Canadian Corps.  For the month of April there will be a display on Vimy associated with the Currie items on loan from the Canadian War Museum.

 

All this month we will honour 5 Strathroy area soldiers who lost their life at Vimy; John Brown, Charles Perring,  James Kellestine, Asa John Patterson, and Cyril Lowe.

About the Museum

Museum Strathroy-Caradoc opened to the public in 1972. As a community museum we strive to preserve and tell the story of Strathroy-Caradoc, and inspire residents to explore and understand the community around them.

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